GrailQuest Farms
is Located in Seguin, Texas
(30 miles East of San Antonio, TX)

 
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American Guinea Hogs - A 2016 Experiment

Thank you for all the interest. The American Guinea Hogs have been sold.
Due to a change in circumstances, we are having to liquidate our American Guinea Hog herd. At present we have two 16 month old registered, proven sows for $200 each, and 2 male piglets ready to go around Christmas. We also have three female piglets born 12/10/16, that would need to go with their mother. We're asking $100 each for unregistered piglets, but we are open to discussing discounts on the whole herd, or multiple purchases, registered and unregistered.

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Here is how this experience unfolded:

I first encountered these unbelievably sweet-tempered, docile pigs near Klickitat, WA on a commune in the mountains. A group of 6 pigs, mother, father and 4 babies, were busily foraging for acorns beneath the trees. I was surprised to note they were totally oblivious to my dog and me as we approached them.

As we drew closer to one of the larger pigs, I asked the lead communard whether the mother was going to get protective of the babies. He replied by saying no, but the pig we were approaching was the father. I could see no tusks and he made no aggressive moves toward me or my dog as he snuffled past about 4 feet away.

I asked how they contained the pigs to a certain area and was informed that they generally stay in an area near their water supply and only needed to be penned up at night. Otherwise, they spend their days harvesting their own food in the form of acorns, grasses and vegetation in the undergrowth.

When I returned to Texas, I did more research on the breed and found they only grew to 200 or 300 pounds and were once the most popular pig for small landholders' pork and lard production. They were often called “yard pigs” and were known to control snakes and rodents around the homestead.

These last features made me think I may have the slightest chance of persuading my wife to allow a couple of these charming creatures to come live on our place.

We found a nice couple about 2 hours away who had several Guinea Hogs, and we made arrangements to go and let my wife see for herself if the claims I made for the beasts were true. When we got to the swine yard, there were maybe 15 pigs - about 6 sows, 3 boars, and the rest divided between a 3 month old litter and a 6 month old litter.

The first affirmation was the size, even the oldest of the adults was not so large as to appear particularly threatening. Then the little ones came over and flopped on their sides at out feet to have their tummies rubbed. Probably more than anything, that scored major points with the missus. Even the adult females would flop over to be rubbed and scratched, and when the husband of the swine keepers went into the pen with the 200 – 300 pound old males, they lay on either side of him enjoyed a good back-scratching. These were obviously not the man-eating pigs from Deadwood, or the movie Hannibal, although their black coloration did give them the appearance of feral hogs.

We spent about an hour out there at the farm with Debi asking every question she could think of, but it seems the piglets' early charm offensive had won the day, and I went back to collect two 3 month old gilts (girls) the next week.

We dubbed them Rosa Porks and Sally Ham-ings under the theory that, if you're going to name a meat animal, something about that name should be an ever-present reminder of their eventual purpose.

Although we've only had them a little over a month, they have become a great source of enjoyment and amusement with their piggish antics and their shameless flops for belly rubs. They always make me smile – better than anti-depressants, and no prescription required.

Glenn Harper

UPDATE- 07/01/16

In mid-June we added a six month old AGH boar. The girls really seem to like him...but not as much as he obviously likes them! The girls have been coming into season for a couple of months now, so we thought it was time. Linc seems to think he's up to the task. We'll see in three months, three weeks and three days. Please don't tell him, but when the piglets are born, Linc is going to freezer camp, specifically Camp Kenmore...

UPDATE - 10/17/16

Well, the 3/3/3 time has passed since we witnessed Linc in action. Both girls are obviously bred, it is just a waiting game now. Looks like our 'Christmas Piglets' are going to be a little late. More updates coming soon.

UPDATE - 10/31/16

Well, being the independent girl she is, Rosa Porks had her piglets last night - all by herself. It looks like we have three boys and one girl, the runt. All are doing well, and Rosa appears to be a great mom. She hasn't flopped on one yet!

One Day Old

Three Days Old at the Breakfast Buffet

Clyde after piglet-sitting - all day - in the rain

UPDATE - 12/11/16

Sally FINALLY had her piglets! Following Rosa's lead, she did it at night without any human intervention...so unlike the goats. She has three adorable girls and is a very caring mom.

Oh, and Rosa's four are all floppers already! Sweetest little batch of bacon bits!

BTW all three American Guinea Hogs are registered with AGHA.

Thank you for your interest; we have sold all the American Guinea Hogs.
If you have any questions, please ask!

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